Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Justin Leblanc's "Test Tube" Dress

OK sewing scientists, back me up here:  Justin Leblanc's unconventional materials dress that walked the runway at NYFW 2013 was made from PIPET TIPS and not test tubes, am I right?


Look at this gorgeousness!


And here's a couple of admittedly terrible screen shots from episode 13:




No, it's actually pipet tips Justin.  

Top = test tube
Bottom = pipet tip

Now that that little bit of scientific accuracy (and precision!) is over with, how can I make my own pipet tip dress?  I know it is supremely impractical, doesn't allow sitting / kneeling / going to the bathroom, but hey, I'd look and sound fabulous in it!

source unknown


It's vaguely like a native american jingle dress, except the jingles are plastic, not metal.  And they are oriented the other way around.  I made some unblogged jingle dress separates for The Sew Weekly last year, and the post is still here, so now I'm full of ideas about how I can adapt the jingle dress idea and make a kind of sewing scientist unconventional materials dress of my very own.



Wouldn't that be an incredible sew-along?!?  After all, the unconventional materials challenge is most Project Runway fans' favourite episode.  

What do you think?  Am I crazy, or have you also been hankering to go materials shopping at the hardware / grocery / garden center / lab?


OK, I'm on my way over to twitter to try to stir up the idea.  :)




 



26 comments:

  1. YES. I couldn't click over to comment fast enough! We have tons of tips in storage and I know we'll never get through them all, and that dress is absolutely gorgeous! Thanks for clueing us in on the existence of such a garment!

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    1. We no longer have bulk tips because we've moved to a racking system, so I can't easily make a pipet tip dress.....but I do have something in mind using the racks.....

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  2. Absolutely pipet tips. As a chemist I should know.

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  3. As a chemist (and lab manager) I say pipette tips too! Immediately thought of this gaga parody 'bad project' (lab fashion includes a stripette serological pipette corset):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl4L4M8m4d0

    cracks me up every time.

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    1. I saw that one a while ago because it was making the lab rounds. I thought someone at McGill did one too, but now I can't find it.

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    1. I'm seriously thinking about doing it, although it would have made more sense to do as a lead-up to Halloween. Hmmmmm. I'll see how much interest there is, and not just amongst us sewing scientists. ;)

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  5. wow! i stopped watching project runway for 1 season and they've stepped it up! i love your idea, even though i probably wont be participating (lack of time) i would LOVE to see creations from other people!!!

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    1. This was not my favourite season, what with all the drama bordering on violence. It was really too much. There were a few stand out garments, so now that the season is over, I would recommend watching online and skipping through the stupid drama scenes.

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  6. I couldn't resist making a comment when I saw this dress. I've been dreaming about it ever since the finale and the sound it made, crazy gorgeous. It almost drove me to the hardware store to shop some unconventional materials, hehe. I love your idea, and I'd love to participate but as petiterepublic says, time management may be an issue. I'm worried... ;)

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    1. I don't have time either, but with enough weekends, I can probably make something simple in a month or two. Maybe just accessories?

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  7. I didn't catch that he called them test tubes on the show. I've worn materials from our lab for a Halloween costume in the past (no sewing involved...just some knot-tying). I'm a fish ecologist, and I went as "ghost fishing." I wore white clothes with fishing boots and gloves, cloaked myself in an old gillnet, entwined some hooks and some fake fish skeletons, and attempted to embody the concept of lost fishing gear that continues to catch fishes. I realize it's always dangerous to choose an overly-conceptual costume, but I thought at a party full of fisheries scientists, it would be well-received...no one got it. Oh well, I had fun! An unconventional materials sewalong would be a lot of fun. You should definitely make your pipet dress!

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    1. I come from a fishing community in Nova Scotia, and my father worked in aquaculture research, so I'd like to think that I would have gotten your costume idea ;) We're having a costume contest at our institute this year for the very first time, but with lots of warnings about making them lab safe! Maybe I'll try something conceptual and see how many people get it.

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  8. I loooooooved that dress. Was definitely my favourite piece all season. But my girl totally won, fair and square. Love the idea for an unconventional materials jam - I am up to my ears in projects so I'm not sure i Have time to participate but I will be ROOTING FROM THE SIDELINES.

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    1. I wasn't really taken with anyone in particular this year; not sure why, but I really didn't feel strongly about any contestant. (Well, I did feel strongly about a borderline psychotic contestant getting removed!)

      Maybe it would be a good idea to do in the new year? I know that the next couple of months are really full for me because I'm parenting alone, research grant is coming to an end and I have to PRODUCE RESULTS NOW, Christmas prep, etc.

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  9. Definitely not test tubes. I thought from the thumbnail that they might be cut up droppers, but as a mere mathematical physicist I bow to your superior chemical hardware knowledge. :)

    I'd be in for an unconventional materials challenge. To be honest, I'll probably never have enough time, but maybe in the new year when I've cleared my sewing deck... and speaking of unconventional sewing materials...

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    1. I've been thinking about how to repurpose left over (uncontaminated!) lab materials for a while. I don't want to make something costumey; I'd rather make something wearable that goes undetected, but then catches people's attention on second glance and makes them question the materials.

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  10. I have tips!! I was just given a whole bunch more if I PROMISED to make something like this : )

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    1. I shudder to think of how many tips were needed! Each box = 96 tips; 96 will probably cover 30cm square, so I'd guess there are ~2000 tips on there???

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  11. An unconventional materials sewalongs sounds fab. If only I had more free time!

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  12. Super fun sewalong idea! Can't wait to see everyone's projects!!

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  13. that really is a great idea.. hope i can find some time to participate

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  14. I don't watch reality shows but sewing with unconventional materials does sound like a lotta fun. Hardware stores are fun to browse in.

    I remember when I was in college and went to the fashion show of a nearby design school and one assignment the students had was to make something out of other things. The showstopper was an evening dress made out of broken black umbrellas.

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  15. I haven't been doing any sewing for weeks and weeks because of family and work commitments (I'm alone with my kids and a full time job from Monday night-Friday evening, so that means that about 75% of my free time is gone temporarily). BUT, I have been collecting my materials for an unconventional make! More to come on my next post......

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  16. You showed really good dress for test tube.. I got some special tips. Thanks

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